Rodriguez Lewis & Kahn
213.267.9790
Click here to connect to our office now. Haga clic aquƭ para espaƱoles.
Home Attorney Profiles Criminal Defense Contact Us
Criminal Defense Practice Areas
Criminal Defense
Appeals
Child Abuse
Child Endangerment
Drug Crimes
Expungement
Extradition
Federal Cases
Felon with a Firearm
Felonies
Hate Crimes
Murder
Petty Theft with a Prior
Property Crimes
Sex Crimes
Violent Crimes
White Collar Crimes
Send us an email today to tell us about your case.
Name:
Email:
Phone:
Message:

California Felony Lawyer

Representation for Individuals Charged with Felony Offenses

The criminal justice system is one that generally uses a pre-determined guideline to punish individuals who are convicted of crimes. These guidelines concern crimes of varying levels, as our society and our criminal justice system classifies offenses according to their severity. For example, traffic tickets are infractions and crimes such as shoplifting are often misdemeanors. Felonies, therefore, are the most serious criminal allegations one may face.

Although punishment and consequences will always vary from case to case, felony charges are nearly always severe and entail long-term, if not life-changing, repercussions. In many felony cases, there are mandatory terms of imprisonment. In the most serious felony cases, individuals may face a lifetime in prison. Felony convictions may arise in one of two following ways:

  • A felony offense – some crimes, according to the California Penal Code, are considered more serious than others and are charged as felony offenses. These may include violent crimes, certain theft crimes, sex crimes, and other charges. Depending on the facts of the case, an experienced attorney can either work toward having these charges dismissed or having them reduced to lesser offenses that are penalized with less harsh consequences.
  • Aggravating circumstances – criminal charges may be elevated to felonies if aggravating circumstances are present, even if the offense is not typically a felony crime. The most common example of this would be having prior criminal convictions. Driving under the influence, for example, becomes a felony level offense if drivers have been convicted of DUI three previous times within a 10-year-period. The same holds true for many theft crimes, such as shoplifting.

California's Three Strikes Law

A unique concern for individuals who face felony allegations in California is the state's notorious Three Strikes Law. Considered one of the harshest sentencing policies in nation, the Three Strikes Law is designed to punish individuals who are convicted of multiple felony offenses. It generally works as follows:

  • Being convicted of a new felony strike offense with one prior strike will result in elevated penalties, including longer terms of imprisonment.
  • Being convicted of a new felony strike offense – that is considered a serious crime – with two prior strikes can result in an automatic sentence of 25 years to life in prison.

The Three Strikes Law has come under considerable scrutiny in recent years and continues to remain a hotly debated topic. Regardless, anyone facing serious felony allegations with one or two prior strikes should be intent on working with our firm's proven and aggressive California criminal defense lawyers.

Speak with a Felony Lawyer in California Today

At Rodriquez, Lewis & Kahn, our California criminal attorneys draw from more than 70 years of combined experience to protect the freedoms of our clients and defend their futures from felony convictions. Given the high stakes of these cases, felony charges demand the attention of seasoned legal minds. To discuss your case with a member of our legal team, fill out a case evaluation form or call toll-free (213) 267-9790 as soon as possible.

213.267.9790

Facebook Twitter Google+ Coming Soon
The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.